White Papers

Miniature Spectrometers for Narrowband Laser Characterization

By Ocean Optics
9 February 2015

White Paper Lead ImageWhether measuring center wavelength, spectral shape or power, compact spectrometers are a convenient, low-cost tool for the characterization and monitoring of many types of laser sources. This whitepaper explores in full the benefits of miniature spectrometers.

High LIDT optical components for ultrafast applications - what are the specific points

By Manx Precision Optics Ltd.,
30 January 2015

White Paper Lead ImageUltrafast lasers have seen much development and are now used in a wide range of applications ranging from extremely high power experiments to medical and engineering applications. With the increase in the use of these lasers the demand for suitable optical components and the required specifications has increased.

Spirit Sampling for Counterfeit Detection and Brand Authentication

By Nick Barnett. Ph.D
7 November 2014

White Paper Lead ImageIncidents of whisky and spirits counterfeiting pose serious health risks to citizens and potential revenue loss to brand owners. The Ocean Optics Spirit Sampler can help to combat increased sales of illicit spirits by providing a means of counterfeit detection and brand authentication in the field. The success of such a screening device depends on the reproducibility of measurements from sample to sample and from device to device. This application note describes measurements performed to demonstrate Spirit Sampler device reproducibility and outlines some of the instrument’s brand management software features.

How is laser Power/Energy measurement affected by incidence angle?

By Mark Slutzki
29 October 2014

White Paper Lead ImageModern laser applications demand ever-increasing accuracy in the measurement and control of the laser beam. Various types of sensors and instruments are in use today, the choice depending on the type of measurement needed. However, even given the correct choice of equipment, there are measurement conditions that can seriously affect the accuracy of the readings obtained if not correctly taken into account.

All About Coatings

By Edmund Optics
14 October 2014

White Paper Lead ImageIn every realm of physical science, surface properties dictate much of the interaction between an object and its environment. This is true for optics as well. Although the bulk properties of glasses certainly influence an optic’s interaction with light, the shape and smoothness of the surface are the primary determinants of the way a lens or mirror modifies the propagation of light. In addition to surface shape and quality, the coatings on an optical surface strongly affect an optic’s interaction with light. Specifically, coatings significantly modify the behavior of light at different wavelengths. Nearly every modern optical system depends on effective optical coatings.

Using the full spectrum for Raman: from UV to NIR

By Prof W R. Browne, Dr A. Draksharapu, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry, NL & Dr E. Illy Cobolt AB
26 September 2014

White Paper Lead ImageThe ”inelastic scattering of light”, or Raman effect, was observed in practice for the first time in 1928 by C.V. Raman for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1930. It is only in the last two decades, however, that Raman spectroscopy has begun to realize its potential as an almost universally applicable analytical technique from materials and life sciences applications to point of care analysis. This is primarily thanks to the availability of compact laser sources, high sensitivity cameras and high resolution compact spectrometers.

Removing Heat from Optical Systems Using Broadband Hot Mirrors - A Radical New Solution

By Ken Norris
21 July 2014

White Paper Lead ImageA revolutionary new design of a Broadband hot mirror is described and details of how heat can now be successfully eliminated from light sources in many different optical systems.

New compact high repetition rate lasers for LIBS

By Håkan Karlsson, Elizabeth Illy, Bertrand Noharet & Tania Irebo
3 June 2014

White Paper Lead ImageLaser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an atomic-emission spectroscopy technique that enables rapid chemical analysis of a wide range of materials ranging from metals, semiconductors, glasses, biological tissues, plastics, soils, thin-paint coating, and electronic materials. The LIBS technology has received substantially increased interest over recent years as a result of the development of more compact, even hand-held, systems that enables in-field use and construction of tools for on-line material analysis. This development has been made possible by the increased availability of more compact and industrial-grade system components including lasers, spectrographs and CCD cameras. In this application note we present how a new class of compact lasers with multi-kHZ pulse repetition rates enables significant reduction of the footprint of a LIBS system.