White Papers

All About Coatings

By Edmund Optics
14 October 2014

White Paper Lead ImageIn every realm of physical science, surface properties dictate much of the interaction between an object and its environment. This is true for optics as well. Although the bulk properties of glasses certainly influence an optic’s interaction with light, the shape and smoothness of the surface are the primary determinants of the way a lens or mirror modifies the propagation of light. In addition to surface shape and quality, the coatings on an optical surface strongly affect an optic’s interaction with light. Specifically, coatings significantly modify the behavior of light at different wavelengths. Nearly every modern optical system depends on effective optical coatings.

Using the full spectrum for Raman: from UV to NIR

By Prof W R. Browne, Dr A. Draksharapu, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry, NL & Dr E. Illy Cobolt AB
26 September 2014

White Paper Lead ImageThe ”inelastic scattering of light”, or Raman effect, was observed in practice for the first time in 1928 by C.V. Raman for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1930. It is only in the last two decades, however, that Raman spectroscopy has begun to realize its potential as an almost universally applicable analytical technique from materials and life sciences applications to point of care analysis. This is primarily thanks to the availability of compact laser sources, high sensitivity cameras and high resolution compact spectrometers.

Removing Heat from Optical Systems Using Broadband Hot Mirrors - A Radical New Solution

By Ken Norris
21 July 2014

White Paper Lead ImageA revolutionary new design of a Broadband hot mirror is described and details of how heat can now be successfully eliminated from light sources in many different optical systems.

New compact high repetition rate lasers for LIBS

By Håkan Karlsson, Elizabeth Illy, Bertrand Noharet & Tania Irebo
3 June 2014

White Paper Lead ImageLaser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an atomic-emission spectroscopy technique that enables rapid chemical analysis of a wide range of materials ranging from metals, semiconductors, glasses, biological tissues, plastics, soils, thin-paint coating, and electronic materials. The LIBS technology has received substantially increased interest over recent years as a result of the development of more compact, even hand-held, systems that enables in-field use and construction of tools for on-line material analysis. This development has been made possible by the increased availability of more compact and industrial-grade system components including lasers, spectrographs and CCD cameras. In this application note we present how a new class of compact lasers with multi-kHZ pulse repetition rates enables significant reduction of the footprint of a LIBS system.

All About Aspheric Lenses

By Edmund Optics
30 May 2014

White Paper Lead ImageGETTING STARTED: Benefits of an aspheric lens

Ophir Pyro OEM Sensors – What options are available?

By Julian Marsden
6 May 2014

White Paper Lead ImagePyroelectric sensors have been used widely in the laser industry for many years to measure energy. They allow measurement of individual pulse energy or pulse-to-pulse variation for rapidly pulsing lasers, something that cannot be done with photodiode or thermal sensors. They also are not limited to visible or near-IR wavelengths like photodiodes, allowing measurements into the deep IR and THz regions. Ophir has recently introduced a new series of Pyroelectric OEM sensors based on the “PE-C” line of standard Pyroelectric sensors, which were introduced in 2011. This document presents the various options available to customers, lists the advantages of the new series over existing products, and mentions the capabilities of the new line.

Narrow line diode laser stacks for DPAL pumping

By DILAS
1 May 2014

White Paper Lead ImageDiode pumped alkali metal vapour lasers (DPALs) offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality, making them an attractive candidate for future defence applications. A variety of gain media are used and each requires a different pump wavelength: near 852nm for caesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm.

CEO/CEP stabilisation of Ti:sapphire femtosecond lasers without AOM

By Laser Quantum
11 April 2014

White Paper Lead ImageThe carrier-envelope offset frequency and phase of a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser can be stabilised by directly feeding back to the output power of a 532nm finesse pure 10 Watt pump laser with our new CEP feature. The performance with this approach matches that of traditional setups employing acousto-optic modulators in the pump beam (~100 mrad integrated phase noise) but has potential for massive improvement due to the enhanced available modulation bandwidth compared to AOMs (approximately 700kHz versus tens of kHz).