Features

01 August 2006

Nick Morris reads up on the latest advances in the printing and graphics industry

01 August 2006

John Murphy talks to Will Pierce, of the Florida-based spectrometer company Stellar-Net.

01 August 2006

With its billion-plus population and rapid development, China is becoming both a major customer and supplier of photonics components, as Warren Clark discovers

01 June 2006

Ken Ibbs, director of marketing at JDSU, believes the photonics industry is reaching a tipping point

01 June 2006

John Murphy discovers how CVI is making inroads into Europe from the Isle of Man

01 June 2006

Nick Morris predicts a bright future for LEDs

01 June 2006

Glenn Barrowman reports on another successful year for Photonics Cluster (UK)

01 June 2006

Nick Morris examines new directions in spectroscopy

01 May 2006

John Murphy discovers how Active Silicon is ploughing its own furrow in a specialist niche

Every technologist dreams of founding their own company. Some dream of becoming the Microsoft of their industrial sector and they hope that no matter how big the company gets, they will be the exception and be able to always work on something technically interesting.

The sad truth is that most technology companies have to become sales companies to make a living. They can only grow by hoping to come up with something that will compete with the big boys and that seldom has anything to do with technology.

01 May 2006

Nick Morris gets up close with this intricate application of lasers

Laser micromachining is fast becoming a routine method of fabricating mass produced parts, as well as manufacturing intricately designed components for specialised applications. Laser micromachining is now commonplace in the component manufacturing sector, supplying industries that demand very high precision – such as aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and electronics industries, to name but a few. Lasers can be used for a variety of processes to produce feature sizes in the 1-500µm range, with submicron accuracy.

01 May 2006

Technology is in a constant war against obsolescence. Fall behind the curve of emerging applications, and you will quickly find your business scrambling for the under-funded, leftover customers. Once the cutting edge is lost, it is hard to recapture. Morale will drop, your business will wane and profitability will falter. Though simply stated, it is difficult to avoid this pitfall as you concentrate on filling today's needs. Scientific tools need a constant influx of product definition and technology development activities to keep pace with maturing markets and ahead of developing ones. Often this reinvigoration comes from an innovative combination of existing and sometimes disparate technologies. An example of this can be seen in how optical profiler manufacturers are serving the still rapidly growing microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) metrology market.

01 May 2006

Nick Morris surveys the national and international security markets

Twenty years after President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative – nicknamed 'star wars' – failed to move beyond the concept phase of development, there has been some suspicion of using lasers, or other high tech devices, for defence and security applications. However, those in the defence establishment are now taking the huge possibilities that photonics offers seriously again; from lasers mounted in airplanes for the new anti-ballistic missile system, through to optical fibre microphones for submarines.

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