August/September 2007

FEATURE

Stuttgart is the place to be for laser technology

LASYS – the new international trade fair for system solutions in laser materials processing – is currently the only laser materials processing trade fair to showcase both systems and processes and to have comprehensive coverage of materials and all industry sectors. As a result, it will no longer be necessary for providers to exhibit at isolated trade fairs. Now they will have the opportunity to address customers from all areas of the capital goods industry at a single event.

FEATURE

Fibre provides

The collapse of the telecom industry was a dark period for many fibre optic suppliers. ‘We had a hard time there,’ says Rob Morris, director of marketing at Ocean Optics. ‘It probably eliminated some of the weaker players.’

Optical fibres were the basis of the industry, providing the data transfer links for high-speed communication. It took a while before

FEATURE

The fibre explosion

Anyone who attended the Laser World of Photonics conference in Munich in June can be in no doubt that the fibre laser market is booming. IPG, SPI, Newport Spectra-Physics, Koheras, Jenoptik, and Trumpf were just a few of the exhibitors displaying their shining new fibre lasers, and talks at the Industry Workshops discussed how to apply these new products to everything from delicate scribing to heavy industrial machining.

FEATURE

Look east

The evidence is clear even from the printed catalogue of the Laser 2007 exhibition, held in June this year. The listing of Chinese exhibitors stretched for two and a half columns. Only Germany, the USA, and the UK had more column-inches, so China ranked fourth in terms of exhibitor numbers at this international trade fair.

FEATURE

Structured light measures up

Deep water oceanography has never been so important. On the level of pure science, there is growing belief that the ocean depths may hold important information about the origins of life on Earth. Understanding deep water geophysical structures is increasingly seen as the key to better anticipation of natural events, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis. And the quest for new sources of oil in politically stable regions is leading to renewed attempts to explore known deep-water oilfields in the oceans around Newfoundland and the Falkland Islands.