Origami XP-S

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NKT Photonics has extended the performance of its Origami XP series of industrial-grade femtosecond lasers with the Origami XP-S. Combining industrial design with exceptional reliability, the new high-energy system provides up to 75uJ/pulse in the near infrared (1,030nm) or optionally 35uJ/pulse in the green (515nm).

The performance improvements of the XP-S provide enhanced flexibility in precise materials processing; especially for cutting thicker substrates and drilling deep holes in glass, ceramics, and the thin or thick metals used in medical devices. The ultrashort pulse width guarantees excellent surface and edge quality without the need for post-processing steps in various applications.

Features include: being housed in a single air-cooled, box for easy integration; less than 400fs standard pulsewidth; up to 5W average power; single-shot or pulse-on-demand options; outstanding energy and pointing stability; an industrial, rugged design; the ability to be mountable in any direction; real-time pulse energy measurement and control; unprecedented reliability; and a second harmonic option.

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