Raman

Fast Raman Hyperspectral scanning of mining core samples

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Long wave infrared (LWIR) spectroscopy is of great interest to spectral geologists. This is because minerals such as quartz, k-feldspar, pyroxene, hornblende, anorthite, calcite, and dolomite are only identifiable in the LWIR range, not in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) range. However, Raman spectroscopy is complementary to LWIR spectroscopy, providing fingerprint spectra of these minerals and an alternative identification method. But Raman spectroscopy also provides several additional benefits on the instrument side.

One small step

Keely Portway looks at how researchers and commercial entities are developing Raman technology to benefit medical applications

Authentication of Pisco: From origin to alcohol content with Raman

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Raman spectroscopy is emerging as a rapid, portable tool to test premium liquors for evidence of adulteration or substitution –problems relevant in the rising production of pisco in Peru, where the liquor must originate from specific grape varieties and regions. Here we demonstrate the ability of 1064 Raman to distinguish pure pisco from mixtures, identify the specific grape variety, and quantify both ethanol and methanol content with a high degree of accuracy – thus validating origin, quality, and safety.

Making flying safer

Optical explosive detection is set to help remove restrictions on the liquids airline passengers can carry on, finds Andy Extance

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