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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy used to design safer lithium batteries

The study finds that nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be used to see fast ions moving between the lithium metal anode and its passivation layer, while also detecting the chemical compounds on the surface

The study finds that nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be used to see fast ions moving between the lithium metal anode and its passivation layer, while also detecting the chemical compounds on the surface.

A team of engineers at Columbia University has used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to design new electrolytes and anode surfaces for the production of high-performance lithium metal batteries.

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