quantum

The space sector offers numerous oppurtunities for photonics technologies in the development and offering of satellite-based services. (Image: Shutterstock/Dima Zel)

Looking skyward: Photonics opportunities in space

The ongoing commercialisation of the space sector is creating numerous opportunities for photonics technologies, Matthew Dale learns

Preliminary testing of the quantum gravity gradiometer designed by Michael Holynski and colleagues at the University of Birmingham, which has now been shown to locate an underground tunnel with a positional accuracy of 20cm. Credit: Crown Copyright

Underground quantum sensing set to erupt

Susan Curtis explores the new breed of quantum gravimeters finding their way onto the slopes of Mount Etna and into tunnels deep under Birmingham

The DQG is composed of a main sensor head standing at 175cm high, around 66 kg, connected to the ILS system, at around 33kg. The combined system can be operated with a power as little as 200W. Credit: iXblue

iXblue develops commercial quantum sensor for underground mapping

The system can measure simultaneously the absolute values of both gravitational acceleration and its vertical gradient

Dr Peter Leibinger, CTO of Trumpf, speaking at the World of Quantum forum at Laser World of Photonics. Credit: Matthew Dale

Quantum race will be long: Peter Leibinger in Munich

Dr Peter Leibinger, CTO of Trumpf, has called for a joined-up strategy on quantum technologies on the first day of Laser World of Photonics in Munich

QuiX Quantum announces quantum light sources

QuiX Quantum, the market leader in photonic quantum computing hardware, has announced a new product line of quantum photonic processors, which are compatible with quantum light sources in the near-infrared wavelength range (900-970 nm), including InGaAs quantum dots.

This product line complements QuiX Quantum’s existing offerings of quantum photonic processors at telecom wavelength, and near-term quantum computers. The processor offers the record specifications that have become a hallmark of QuiX Quantum’s devices.

Artistic representation of a neural network containing optically-interconnected Mach-Zehnder interferometers. The interferometer is the main component of the quantum memristor. (Credit: Equinox Graphics, University of Vienna)

Accelerating artificial neurons with photonic circuits

Physicists at the University of Vienna have demonstrated a new device, called a quantum memristor, which may allow scientists to combine AI and quantum computing, in order to unlock unprecedented capabilities for research.

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