White Papers

03 June 2014

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an atomic-emission spectroscopy technique that enables rapid chemical analysis of a wide range of materials ranging from metals, semiconductors, glasses, biological tissues, plastics, soils, thin-paint coating, and electronic materials. The LIBS technology has received substantially increased interest over recent years as a result of the development of more compact, even hand-held, systems that enables in-field use and construction of tools for on-line material analysis. This development has been made possible by the increased availability of more compact and industrial-grade system components including lasers, spectrographs and CCD cameras. In this application note we present how a new class of compact lasers with multi-kHZ pulse repetition rates enables significant reduction of the footprint of a LIBS system.

30 May 2014

GETTING STARTED: Benefits of an aspheric lens.

06 May 2014

Pyroelectric sensors have been used widely in the laser industry for many years to measure energy. They allow measurement of individual pulse energy or pulse-to-pulse variation for rapidly pulsing lasers, something that cannot be done with photodiode or thermal sensors. They also are not limited to visible or near-IR wavelengths like photodiodes, allowing measurements into the deep IR and THz regions. Ophir has recently introduced a new series of Pyroelectric OEM sensors based on the “PE-C” line of standard Pyroelectric sensors, which were introduced in 2011. This document presents the various options available to customers, lists the advantages of the new series over existing products, and mentions the capabilities of the new line.

01 May 2014

Diode pumped alkali metal vapour lasers (DPALs) offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality, making them an attractive candidate for future defence applications. A variety of gain media are used and each requires a different pump wavelength: near 852nm for caesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm.

21 April 2014

The carrier-envelope offset frequency and phase of a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser can be stabilised by directly feeding back to the output power of a 532nm finesse pure 10 Watt pump laser with our new CEP feature. The performance with this approach matches that of traditional setups employing acousto-optic modulators in the pump beam (~100 mrad integrated phase noise) but has potential for massive improvement due to the enhanced available modulation bandwidth compared to AOMs (approximately 700kHz versus tens of kHz).

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