Industry-research project boosts commercialisation of quantum computers

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Strontium Lattice Clock – Blue fluorescing cloud of strontium atoms (arrow) that have been laser-cooled to milli-Kelvin temperatures. Credit: Physical-Technical Federal Institute (PTB)

A new project involving Toptica, Osram, and the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits, aims to scale up quantum computers and take them from the basic research stage to market maturity.

Within the DigiQuant project, new laser diodes will be developed at ams Osram suitable for hybrid integration of photonic waveguides and digital control electronics at Toptica.

In parallel, the miniaturisation of electronics in integrated circuits for digitised operation of any material class laser diodes from diverse manufacturers will be investigated with Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS and Toptica.

The miniaturised and digitised subsystem will be tested in two different applications, a quantum computer application and in an industrial application to readout a digital code with a hand-held scanner.

Bringing quantum computers to market

These combined developments will enable the implementation of complex laboratory technology in portable and robust devices with high wall plug efficiency for industrial use and help to scale up quantum computers and take them from the basic research stage to market maturity.

The project is funded by the Bavarian Ministry of Economic Affairs, Regional Development and Energy (StMWi).

Illustration of a three-dimensional crystal with various types of confining centres. (a) Crystal with four confining centres, each trapping waves (yellow) in all three dimensions simultaneously. (b) Crystal with a linear confining centre where waves can propagate in one dimension, analogous to an optical fibre. (c) Crystal with a planar confining centre where waves can propagate in two dimensions, analogous to a 2D electron gas. (Image: Vos et al.)

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