Thanks for visiting Electro Optics.

You're trying to access an editorial feature that is only available to logged in, registered users of Electro Optics. Registering is completely free, so why not sign up with us?

By registering, as well as being able to browse all content on the site without further interruption, you'll also have the option to receive our magazine (multiple times a year) and our email newsletters.

II-VI increases capacity to meet molecular diagnostic testing requirements

Share this on social media:

US optoelectronic component manufacturer, II-VI is increasing its manufacturing capacity of components and sub-assemblies for molecular diagnostic testing systems. Specifically, the firm is doing so for those that underpin the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing platforms of its customers.

An increase in deployment of PCR test equipment at the healthcare point of service has been driving demand for the company’s subsystems, incorporating its thermoelectric and optical components. This allows rapid replication and identification of target genetic sequence. The vendor is ramping up its global manufacturing and supply chain to produce thermoelectric sub-assemblies in order to meet the recent and anticipated sustained surge in demand in the PCR system supply chain, which has largely been brought about by the spread of Covid-19. 

PCR systems have their challenges when it comes to simultaneously applying a highly uniform and rapid rate of temperature change across the genetic sample to drive replication. II-VI is confident that its thermoelectric products, which are designed in Dallas, Texas, and manufactured in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, meet the stringent performance requirements and the reliability endurance of hundreds of thousands of rapid temperature cycles.

Dr. Chuck Mattera, chief executive officer, II-VI Incorporated said: ‘We are proud of all of our employees around the world for their tireless dedication to the life sciences ecosystems organized to overcome Covid-19.’ 

II-VI completed the acquisition of optical communications firm Finisar, in the last quarter of 2019.

Related news

The authors suggest that placing UVC light sources at ventilation systems and rooms not in use, without direct optical paths to humans, helps reduce virus propagation. Credit: Nacho Gaubert

30 June 2020

Prototype of the UVC LED irradiation system with 118 LEDs. The inset shows a detail of the LED array (©FBH/P. Immerz)

27 May 2020